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Darren Joyce, of iWeatherOnline.com, writes:

You may notice it is rather mild if not warm today, particularly along the east coast where it is 17c. The source of this warm weather is the Canary Islands where winds over Ireland today have originated. The arrow-making staff of our graphics department have been hard at work for hours, as you can see.

Ireland enjoys unseasonably warm temperatures (iWeatherOnline.com)

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Dublin Web Summit Founder Paddy Cosgrave

You MUST decide.

Explaining the growth of the Dublin Web Summit, Paddy Cosgrave writes:

It’s taken us 4 years to scale Web Summit from 400 attendees to 20,000 and a bunch of physicists have played a big part.
Back in 2010, 3 international journalists showed up, this year it will exceed 1,200. Investors is up from 4 to over 800. Exhibitors from 3 to over 2,000.
With each passing year an increasing number of people ask how has it grown so fast? When I share the answer it’s almost never what people expect, so here it is:

Our growth has been largely propelled by data science. Or more correctly, in my view, network science. While conference companies hire event managers, we hire physicists with PHDs in areas like complex systems and network analysis. They then apply that knowledge and understanding to the task of creating and optimising real life networks. After all a conference is a network, albeit a momentary one. We love stuff like Gephi, NetworkX and Datasift, and algorithms like eigenvector centrality, Force Atlas and Fruchterman-Reingold.

…In other words, we “engineer serendipity” at the scale of 20,000 attendees. Put another way, the people at your table or on your pub crawl at Web Summit are neither a random collection of attendees nor a manually curated group of attendees, but rather the product of algorithms

Um.

Engineering Serendipity: The Story of Web Summit’s Growth (Paddy Cosgrave, Dubl;n Web Summitt blog)

(Mark Stedman/Photocall Ireland)

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Baltimore Sea Safari writes:

“This battered and bloodied Atlantic Grey Seal was hauled out on Quarantine Island [Co. Cork]. He bears the scars of a mating season encounter, when the dominant male guards a harem of females, and will defend off all possible suitors or challengers. These challengers often end up like this guy, defeated, dejected and bloodied.”

Harem, eh?

FIGHT!